be sure and

Each of these three words is inoffensive, but the idea which their combination expresses should be conveyed by "be sure to." In such a construction, what follows be sure is always an infinitive, not a group of words connected by and: "Be sure to (not and) let me hear from you."

Dictionary of problem words and expressions. . 1975.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sure — 1 assured, *confident, sanguine, presumptuous Analogous words: relying, trusting, depending, counting, banking (see RELY): inerrant, unerring, *infallible: *safe, secure 2 Sure, certain, positive, cocksure mean having or showing no doubt. Sure… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Sure Radio — StudentMedia logofile = SureRadiologo.jpg logosize = 150px name=Sure Radio type=Radio launch=1995 web=http://www.sureradio.com/ media associations=Student Radio Association, Community Media Association university=University of Sheffield… …   Wikipedia

  • sure — sure1 [ ʃur ] adjective *** 1. ) certain that something is real, true, or correct: I think she s called Monica, but I m not sure. sure (that): Are you sure these figures are right? I was sure that I had left my keys on the counter. sure about: If …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • sure */*/*/ — I UK [ʃɔː(r)] / UK [ʃʊə(r)] / US [ʃʊr] adjective Word forms sure : adjective sure comparative surer superlative surest Ways of indicating that you feel sure about something: I m sure → the most usual way of saying that you are sure about… …   English dictionary

  • sure — sureness, n. /shoor, sherr/, adj., surer, surest, adv. adj. 1. free from doubt as to the reliability, character, action, etc., of something: to be sure of one s data. 2. confident, as of something expected: sure of success. 3. convinced, fully… …   Universalium

  • sure — [[t]ʃʊər, ʃɜr[/t]] adj. sur•er, sur•est, adv. 1) free from doubt as to the reliability, character, action, etc., of something: to be sure of one s facts[/ex] 2) confident, as of something expected: sure of success[/ex] 3) convinced, fully… …   From formal English to slang

  • sure — I. adjective (surer; surest) Etymology: Middle English seur, sure, from Anglo French seur, from Latin securus secure Date: 13th century 1. obsolete safe from danger or harm 2. firmly established ; steadfast < a sure …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • sure — /ʃɔ / (say shaw) adjective (surer, surest) 1. (sometimes followed by of) free from apprehension or doubt as to the reliability, character, action, etc., of something: to be sure of one s data. 2. confident, as of something expected: sure of… …   Australian English dictionary

  • sure — [14] Sure and secure are doublets – that is to say, they come from the same ultimate source, but have diverged over the centuries. Latin sēcūrus (etymologically ‘without care’) was borrowed directly into English as secure, but in Old French it… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • sure — [14] Sure and secure are doublets – that is to say, they come from the same ultimate source, but have diverged over the centuries. Latin sēcūrus (etymologically ‘without care’) was borrowed directly into English as secure, but in Old French it… …   Word origins

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